Publications

Comtois, R. et G. Duhaime, 2003

Abandoned Mining Exploration Equipment in Nunavik. Methods to Identify and Locate Potential Sites, In: Rasmussen, R.O. & N.E. Koroleva (eds.), Social and Environmental Impacts in the North. Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop: Methods in Evaluation of Socio-Economic and Environmental Consequences of Mining and Energy Production in the Arctic and Sub-Arctic,, Apatity, Russia, from 8 to 12 May 2002. Kluwer, NATO Science Series IV (Earth and Environmental Sciences), Volume 31, pp. 353-367.

Résumé Since the 1950s, the territory of Québec has been the site of important mining and exploration works. Prior to 1976, mining companies were not required to clean up exploration sites, and consequently there are a large number of abandoned mine and exploration sites where outdated equipment and empty drums has been left, just as the presence of oil and chemical wastes has become of concern for the Inuit populations due to health and environment hazards. The main challenge of the inventory project has been to develop methods which has enabled the location of the abandoned sites. The paper presents the different approaches to the problem, with details about techniques which have turned out to be effective.

Duhaime, G., R. Auclair, N. Bernard, D. St-Pierre, H. Myers et G. Hansen, 2003

Les réseaux d'approvisionnement alimentaire des ménages de l'Arctique nord-américain, Chaire de recherche du Canada sur la condition autochtone comparée, Collection recherche en ligne, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, 38p.

Résumé non disponible

Duhaime, G., N. Bernard, P. Fréchette, M. Maillé, A. Morin et A. Caron, 2003

The Mining Industry and the Social Stakes of Development in the Arctic, Canada Research Chair on Comparative Aboriginal Condition, Collection recherche en ligne, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, 20p.

Résumé non disponible

Statistique Canada, 2003

Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones 2001: guide des concepts et méthodes, Ottawa, Statistique Canada, catalogue no 89-591-XIF, 49p.

Résumé Ce document vise à fournir aux utilisateurs une explication des concepts et des définitions utilisées dans l'Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones de 2001, qui a été menée de l'automne 2001 au printemps 2002. On y trouve aussi des détails techniques sur l'échantillonnage, le traitement des données, la qualité des donnés, etc. Dans le guide, on explique la relation entre l'Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones et le Recensement de 2001 et on souligne les différences importantes entre les données de ces deux sources. Le document comporte aussi une liste de produits.

Statistique Canada, 2003

Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones de 2001, première diffusion: tableaux de soutien 2, Ottawa, Statistique Canada, catalogue no89-595-XIF, 42p.

Résumé L'Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones de 2001 (EAPA) est une enquête postcensitaire incluant les adultes et les enfants ayant déclaré lors du recensement une ascendance autochtone, une identité autochtone, un statut d'Indien inscrit et/ou une appartenance à une bande. Environ 76 000 adultes et 41 000 enfants vivant dans des ménages privés des provinces et des territoires ont été choisis pour participer à l'enquête. Les données ont été recueillies de septembre 2001 à janvier 2002. Ces tableaux contiennent des données sur les raisons pour quitter l'école primaire et secondaire et les raisons pour abandonner les études postsecondaires de la population d'identité autochtone (de 15 ans et plus) vivant hors réserve, pour le Canada, les provinces et les territoires. En outre, on fournit les données de groupes autochtones en particulier (les Indiens de l'Amérique du Nord, les Métis et les Inuits).

Statistique Canada, 2003

Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones de 2001, première diffusion: tableaux de soutien, Ottawa, Statistique Canada, catalogue no 89-592-XIF, 90p.

Résumé L'Enquête auprès des peuples autochtones de 2001 (EAPA) est une enquête postcensitaire incluant les adultes et les enfants ayant déclaré lors du recensement une ascendance autochtone, une identité autochtone, un statut d'Indien inscrit et/ou une appartenance à une bande. Environ 76 000 adultes et 41 000 enfants vivant dans des ménages privés des provinces et des territoires ont été choisis pour participer à l'enquête. Les données ont été recueillies de septembre 2001 à janvier 2002. Ces tableaux contiennent des données sur la santé, l'éducation, les pensionnats et la langue de la population d'identité autochtone (de 15 ans et plus) vivant hors réserve, pour le Canada, les provinces et les territoires. En outre, on fournit les données de groupes autochtones en particulier (les Indiens de l'Amérique du Nord, les Métis et les Inuits) pour quelques variables.

Usher, P., G. Duhaime et E. Searles, 2003

The household as an Economic Unit in Arctic Aboriginal Communities and its Measurement by Means of a Comprehensive survey, Social Indicators Research, 61(2): 175-202.

Résumé Northern aboriginal communities are widely recognized as having mixed, subsistence-based economies. The chief characteristic of this economy, aside from the contribution of subsistence harvesting and related activities to household well-being, is that the household operates as a "micro-enterprise" that is the basic unit of production as well as consumption. This economic form has persisted into the present day, contrary to the predictions of many social scientists and policy-makers. This paper outlines a model of the household in mixed, subsistence-based economies, and describes its characteristics and activities. While the discussion focuses on northern Canada, the model is thought to apply generally in the circumpolar North. Quantitative measurement of northern aboriginal household characteristics and activities has been limited, however, because national and regional data collection systems are not designed specifically to capture these phenomena. The model is therefore based primarily on the results of in-depth case studies, and the systematic measurement of subsistence harvesting. This paper describes the development, for the first time, of a questionnaire specifically designed to document quantitatively the key characteristics of the household economy as part of a comprehensive survey of living conditions in the circumpolar Arctic.

Arbour, Jean-Maurice, 2002

Food Secutity in the Arctic and International Environmental Law: A General Framework, In: Duhaime, G. (ed.), Sustainable Food Security in the Arctic. State of Knowledge. Edmonton, University of Alberta, CCI Press & GÉTIC, Occasional publications series no.52, pp. 153-175

Résumé It is impossible to guarantee food security in the Arctic if problems relating to the protection of the environment on the one hand, and the promotion of a sustainable development on the other, are not taken into consideration by governments and people. As major sources of pollution in the Arctic originate both within and outside the region, the eight Arctic countries must work together to address common concerns. While global problems like the depletion of the ozone layer, transboundary air pollution, and global warming requite global solutions, the establishment of regional programs seems more appropriate to solve problems particular to Arctic countries. From the standpoint of international law, environmental problems and problems relating to sustainable development transcend national boundaries. The role of international law is to provide mechanisms to facilitate cooperation between nation states, negotiate the legal norms, regulate the use of resources, settle disputes, supervise implementation of treaties and amend existing treaties through the introduction of new norms. The object of this chapter is to portray the general framework of international environmental law applicable to the Arctic. As regards problems specific to the circumpolar region, there exists a substantial body of instruments that deal with various aspects of the Arctic environment. In the final report, an attempt will be made to measure the effectiveness of existing treaties and identify the legal gaps to be filled in order to assure food security in the Arctic.

Blanchet, Carole, 2002

Diet Profile of Circumpolar Inuit, In: Duhaime, G. (ed.), Sustainable Food Security in the Arctic. State of Knowledge. Edmonton, University of Alberta, CCI Press & GÉTIC, Occasional publications series no.52, pp. 47-60

Résumé Nutrition surveys conducted in the Arctic indicate major variations in nutrient intake among Inuit from different regions. However, no studies have been undertaken to evaluate the importance of these differences or similarities in term of nutrient intakes. In order to provide a basis for comparison of the different Arctic regions, a profile of food consumption and nutritional patterns for each circumpolar region is required. The main objective of this chapter was to describe Inuit diet and estimate nutritional values for each region (Canada, Alaska, Greenland, Siberia), and to study trends over rime. To do this, an inventory was taken of all nutritional surveys conducted on Inuit populations in the circumpolar Arctic, as well as a review of the different survey methods used, and standardized data compiled. For interregional comparisons, only the most recent and most complete surveys were considered. However, the more dated surveys served to establish temporal trends. Mean consumption leve1s, energy and nutrient intakes were measured according to gender and age. The contribution of traditional and market foods to energy and nutrient intakes were also assessed. Finally, the principal diet changes occurring in Inuit populations in the last decades were put in perspective to identify the ideal conditions in which an optimal diet can be secured.

Caulfield, Richard A., 2002

Food Security in Artic Alaska: A Preliminary Assessment, In: Duhaime, G. (ed.), Sustainable Food Security in the Arctic. State of Knowledge. Edmonton, University of Alberta, CCI Press & GÉTIC, Occasional publications series no.52, pp. 75-92

Résumé Alaska's Arctic communities have a dynamic mixed economy that is central to understanding food security and sustainable development. In this economy, cash and country food production are mutually supportive. Country foods are vital to nutritional, economic, and cultural development in Alaska's Aboriginal communities. Research in northern Alaska shows that they are widely obtained, consumed, and shared within families and communities. At the same time, imported foods offer a wide array of nutritional choices. However, they are often expensive, their availability can be uncertain, and their quality can vary greatly. This paper describes Alaska's northern most regions and discusses this mixed economy as it relates to food security and safety. It highlights five major issues affecting food security in northern Alaska: subsistence conflicts, contaminants in country foods, global climate change, industrial development and habitat degradation, and animal rights activism. It also points to additional research needs important to understanding Alaska's food security in a circumpolar context.
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