Publications

Duhaime, Gérard (under the dir.), 2007

A Day, a Month, a Year in Nunavik, Nunivaat, Nunavik Statistical Bulletin, Canada Research Chair on Comparative Aboriginal People, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, No. 3E-august 2007.

Résumé non disponible

Duhaime, Gérard, 2007

Profil socioéconomique du Nunavik 2006, Chaire de recherche du Canada sur la condition autochtone comparée, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, 90p.

Résumé non disponible

Duhaime, Gérard, 2007

Socio-Economic Profile of Nunavik 2006, Canada Research Chair on Comparative Aboriginal Condition, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, 89p.

Résumé non disponible

Duhaime, Gérard (sous la dir.), 2007

Un jour, un mois, une année au Nunavik, Nunivaat, Bulletin statistique du Nunavik, Chaire de recherche du Canada sur la condition autochtone comparée, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, no 3F-Août 2007

Résumé non disponible

Duhaime, G. et V. Robichaud, 2007

Economic Portrait of Nunavik 2003, Canada Research Chair on Comparative Aboriginal People, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, 66p.

Résumé non disponible

Duhaime, G. et V. Robichaud, 2007

Portrait économique du Nunavik 2003, Chaire de recherche du Canada sur la condition autochtone comparée, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, 65p.

Résumé non disponible

Poppel, B., J. Kruse, G. Duhaime et L. Abryutina, 2007

Survey of Living Conditions in the Arctic: Results, Anchorage, Institute of Social and Economic Research, University of Alaska Anchorage, Alaska, United-States, 32p.

Résumé Major findings of the Survey of Living Conditions in the Arctic (SLiCA) are: (1) A combination of traditional activities and cash employment is the prevailing lifestyle of Arctic indigenous peoples; (2) family ties, social support of each other, and traditional activities have a lot to do with why indigenous people choose to remain in Arctic communities; (3) well-being is closely related to job opportunities, locally available fish and game, and a sense of local control. Well-being and depression (and related problems like suicide) are flip sides of the same coin. Improving wellbeing may reduce social problems; and, (4) health conditions vary widely in the Arctic: three-in-four Greenlandic Inuit self-rate their health as at least "very good" compared with one-in-two Canadian and Alaska Inuit and one-in-five Chukotka indigenous people. Findings are based on 7,200 interviews in a probability sample of Iñupiat settlement regions of Alaska, the four Inuit settlement regions of Canada, all of Greenland, and the Anadyrskij, Anadyr, Shmidtovs, Beringovskij, Chukotskij, Iujl'tinskij, Bilibinskij, Chaunskij, Providenskij, Uel'Kal' districts of Chukotka. Indigenous people and researchers from Greenland, Russia, Canada, the United States, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, and Finland collaborated on all phases of the study.

Duhaime, Gérard (sous la dir.), 2006

Les aînés du Nunavik ont de faibles revenus, Nunivaat, Bulletin statistique du Nunavik, Chaire de recherche du Canada sur la condition autochtone comparée, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, no 1F-Décembre 2006.

Résumé non disponible

Duhaime, Gérard (sous la dir.), 2006

Les Nunavimmiut payent plus cher pour les biens de consommation courante, Nunivaat, Bulletin statistique du Nunavik, Chaire de recherche du Canada sur la condition autochtone comparée, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, no 2F-Décembre 2006.

Résumé non disponible

Duhaime, Gérard (under the dir.), 2006

Low Incomes for Nunavik Elders, Nunivaat, Nunavik Statistical Bulletin, Canada Research Chair on Comparative Aboriginal People, Université Laval, Québec, Canada, no 1E-December 2006.

Résumé non disponible
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